Training Programs

How to Sell Drug Testing

In order to get a strong grip on your marketing tactics, keep these five key points in mind: 1) knowledge is power, 2) market yourself, market your business, 3) have an open mind, 4) identify products and services, and 5) sell with integrity, sell with profit.

Knowledge is Power

Know the industry, the products, the regulations, the facts, the myths, the players, what your potential is, and what you can offer.  Find out how to acquire the knowledge, and always ask questions.

Market Yourself, Market Your Business

You must have a marketing mix, which can include the following: local organizations, substance abuse coalitions, insurance industry groups, trade shows, referrals, classified ads, and web sites.  Remember to work your leads and prospects.

Have an Open Mind

Look for opportunities, offer additional products and services, keep learning, and ask questions.

Identify Your Products and Services

As a reseller, you can offer DOT drug testing, DOT compliance packages, supervisor training, employee education, physicals, Non-DOT testing, oral fluid testing, hair testing, instant testing, on-site products, and much more.

Sell with Integrity, Sell with Profit

Ask questions.  Know the regulations.  Follow standards and procedures.  Do it right.  Make a profit.  Always provide superior service to your customers.

How Do You Promote?

A few different ways you can promote your services and products are through the following medium: A great web site, online marketing – paid and unpaid search opportunities, business networking and asking for referrals.

Why Drug Testing?

Promote the safety of employees and the public.  Drug testing contributes positively to a company’s image.  It acts as an effective deterrent to workplace drug abuse.  One in 10 U.S. workers use drugs.  Testing programs for drug use are fairly prevalent, with 48.8% of full-time workers telling the government that their employers conducted testing for drug use.  The highest rates are among restaurant workers (17.4%), construction workers (15.1%), and teachers and social service workers (4%). 

Why Not Drug Test?

The number one reason why some employers do not test employees and job applicants for drugs is concern of increased legal liability.  Some employers are also concerned that drug testing is too costly or that it is prohibited or restricted by state legislation.

Return on Investment (ROI)

Each drug user costs businesses a national average of $7,000 annually.  A national average of 8-10% of drug users occupy today’s workforce.  Do the math…100 employees, multiplied by the percentage of drug users in said workplace (5%), multiplied by $7,000, equals the cost of substance abuse ($35,000).  Compare that figure to the cost of drug testing (100 tests at $45 per test average = $4,500).  That’s $30,500 savings!