More on Medical Marijuana – Utah

The Utah State Legislature is considering two medical marijuana bills.

One is sponsored by Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem; the other is sponsored by Sen. Mark Madsen, R-Saratoga Springs.

Daw’s bill would allow for cannabis oil to be used to treat a long list of diseases and conditions including cancer, HIV/AIDS, and epilepsy. He told the committee that prescribing doctors would provide research on its effectiveness to the legislature that would be considered when the law would come up for renewal.  His staff stated “We feel like this is the prudent manner that to allow for patients to be treated with a component of marijuana that can be considered medicinal,”

Madsen’s bill would allow for THC to be used in cannabis products to treat a similar list of ailments.

It does not look like Utah will allow smoking marijuana as a medicine anytime soon.

Employers need to address both medical and recreational marijuana in their drug-free workplace policies.  Drug-use and drug-testing policies should clearly delineate expectations regarding on-the-job impairment and marijuana use outside of work hours.  Employers, in compliance with applicable state laws, may choose to simply prohibit their employees from working while using or impaired by marijuana. In some states, employers may choose to prohibit marijuana use by all members of their workforce whether on or off duty. Nevertheless, in all cases, a clear policy to guide decisions on when marijuana use is allowed and how to evaluate for impairment must be widely distributed and carefully explained to all workers. Legal consultation during policy development and continual review is imperative to ensure compliance with federal, state, and case law.